Archive

Archive for June, 2013

Using analyzeMFT from other programs


Now that analyzeMFT is a package, it is much easier to use from other programs. Here’s a quick example.


from analyzemft import mft
input_file = open(‘MFT-short’, ‘rb’)
options = mft.set_default_options()
raw_record = input_file.read(1024)
mft_record = {}
mft_record = mft.parse_record(raw_record, options)
print “\nRaw MFT record in analyzeMFT format”
print mft_record
csv_record = mft.mft_to_csv(mft_record, False)
print “\nMFT record in CSV format”
print csv_record
l2t_record = mft.mft_to_l2t(mft_record)
print “\nMFT record in L2T format”
print l2t_record
body_record = mft.mft_to_body(mft_record, options.bodyfull, options.bodystd)
print “\nMFT record in bodyfile format”
print body_record

This will produce:


Raw MFT record in analyzeMFT format

{‘f1’: ‘\x00\x00’, ‘seq’: 1, ‘lsn’: 4.365328012e-314, ‘attr_off’: 56, ‘bitmap’: True, ‘alloc_sizef’: 1024, ‘recordnum’: 0, ‘size’: 424, ‘upd_off’: 48, ‘filename’: ”, ‘upd_cnt’: 3, ‘base_seq’: 0, ‘fncnt’: 1, ‘link’: 1, ‘next_attrid’: 6, ‘data’: True, ‘base_ref’: 0, ‘magic’: 1162627398, (‘fn’, 0): {‘par_ref’: 5, ‘ctime’: <analyzemft.mftutils.WindowsTime instance at 0x107864d40>, ‘par_seq’: 5, ‘nlen’: 4, ‘flags’: 3e-323, ‘real_fsize’: 32686080, ‘mtime’: <analyzemft.mftutils.WindowsTime instance at 0x107864830>, ‘alloc_fsize’: 32686080, ‘nspace’: 3, ‘atime’: <analyzemft.mftutils.WindowsTime instance at 0x1078649e0>, ‘crtime’: <analyzemft.mftutils.WindowsTime instance at 0x107864368>, ‘name’: ‘$MFT’}, ‘notes’: ”, ‘si’: {‘maxver’: 0, ‘ver’: 0, ‘ctime’: <analyzemft.mftutils.WindowsTime instance at 0x1078648c0>, ‘class_id’: 0, ‘usn’: 0.0, ‘sec_id’: 256, ‘quota’: 0.0, ‘own_id’: 0, ‘mtime’: <analyzemft.mftutils.WindowsTime instance at 0x1078647e8>, ‘dos’: 6, ‘atime’: <analyzemft.mftutils.WindowsTime instance at 0x1078645a8>, ‘crtime’: <analyzemft.mftutils.WindowsTime instance at 0x10777ac20>}, ‘flags’: 1}

MFT record in CSV format

[0, ‘Good’, ‘Active’, ‘File’, ‘1’, ‘5’, ‘5’, ”, ‘2007-08-15 15:32:29.656248’, ‘2007-08-15 15:32:29.656248’, ‘2007-08-15 15:32:29.656248’, ‘2007-08-15 15:32:29.656248’, ‘2007-08-15 15:32:29.656248’, ‘2007-08-15 15:32:29.656248’, ‘2007-08-15 15:32:29.656248’, ‘2007-08-15 15:32:29.656248’, ”, ”, ”, ”, ”, ”, ”, ”, ”, ”, ”, ”, ”, ”, ”, ”, ”, ”, ”, ‘True’, ‘False’, ‘True’, ‘False’, ‘False’, ‘False’, ‘True’, ‘False’, ‘False’, ‘True’, ‘False’, ‘False’, ‘False’, ‘False’, ‘False’, ”, ‘N’, ‘N’]

MFT record in L2T format

2007-08-15|15:32:29.656248|TZ|…B|FILE|NTFS $MFT|$FN […B] time|user|host||desc|version||1||format|extra

MFT record in bodyfile format

0|$MFT|0|0|0|0|32686080|1187191949|1187191949|1187191949|1187191949

 


Simple. Hand it a raw MFT record and then ask for the results to be produced in a string in one of three formats. (Hmm, I suppose I should support JSON, too.)

Advertisements
Categories: analyzeMFT

analyzeMFT now available via pip

[Ed Note: Please excuse the formatting. WordPress seems to be doing something funky.]

analyzeMFT just got two major, and related upgrades:

  • You can install it via PyPi
  • It is now a well behaved (?) package and can more easily be included in other programs.

PyPi:

pip install analyzeMFT

Alternatively:

git pull https://github.com/dkovar/analyzeMFT.git
python setup.py install

or, just run it from that directory.

The main program is now much simpler:

#!/usr/bin/python
try:
 from analyzemft import mftsession
except:
 from .analyzemft import mftsession

if __name__=="__main__":
session = mftsession.MftSession()
session.mft_options()
session.open_files()
session.process_mft_file()
session.print_records()

The main program just opens a session, gets options, opens the files, processes the records, and prints the results. All of the records are available via:

session.mft[seqnum]

Where seqnum is the sequence number of the record you want to reference.

You should also be able to ask it to process a single record and return it in raw, bodyfile, L2T CSV, or normal CSV form. If this would be useful, let me know and I’ll document and confirm the process.

Categories: analyzeMFT

First steps in converting analyzeMFT to a Python module, plus improved error handling

I started rewriting analyzeMFT so that it can be loaded as a module and called from other programs. The primary reason is to enable including it in plaso, but perhaps other programs will find a need for it.

The work isn’t done yet, but it is usable as a standalone program still and it has some improved handling of corrupt MFT records so I decided to release it.

Quick install:

Once I finish the work I’ll also make a zip file available.

Notes:

  1. All output between the new and old version is identical except in cases where records are corrupt or incomplete. In those cases, the new output is more accurate.
  2. There is a lot of strangeness going on in MFT records. In restructuring analyzeMFT, I found a number of conditions that I failed to check for but which accidentally didn’t throw errors. For example, there are MFT records with no Standard Information attributes.
  3. Detection of Orphan records, my term, has been improved. Additional research is required to determine what causes them to occur.
  4. Processing time improved slightly
Categories: analyzeMFT